5.


Enforcement

5.1. Enforcement in debt

The parties concerned must comply with legally effective judgments or written orders in civil cases. If a party refuses to do so, the other party may apply to the people’s court for execution, or the judge may refer the matter to an execution officer for enforcement. All fees arising from the enforcement will be borne by the debtor, and the applicant does not have to pay such fees.

5.2. Enforcement in movable property and immovable property

If the debtor subjected to execution fails to fulfil the obligations according to the execution notice and the obligations specified in the legal document, the people’s court will be empowered to make inquiries with the banks, credit cooperatives, or other units that deal with saving into the accounts of the debtor, and will be empowered to freeze or transfer deposits.

If the debtor subjected to execution fails to fulfil the obligations specified in the legal document, the people’s court will be empowered to seal up, freeze, sell by public auction, or sell off part of the property of the debtor for the fulfilment of their obligations.

5.3. Costs

Any party filing a civil lawsuit will pay the court costs according to the rules. In most cases, litigation fees are borne by the losing party.

5.4. Expected time frame

The time frame for enforcement is usually less than six months, but it can be extended when necessary after being approved by the president of the court.


(End of chapter 5 - Enforcement)

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